Tooth-Organ-Connection

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YOUR TEETH and YOUR BODY are CONNECTED

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I found this wonderful piece of art on Dr. Poschneider´s web site.

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One of many  stories from my clinic:

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For many years a patient had suffered from alternating constipation and diarrhoea together with pains in his stomach and large intestine before becoming a patient at my clinic. The initial x-ray showed a large bone loss on the lower right first molar.
This tooth is linked to the large intestine.
The tooth and the abscess were removed, the bone cleaned and some homeopathic remedies injected into this area.
When he came back for checking the healing process only a few days later, his pain was gone as were his constipation and diarrhoea.

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This gives you a first impression on how your teeth are connected with the rest of your body.

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If a tooth develops decay and another doesn´t, this isn´t just a case of poor nutrition and bad bushing. Your teeth reflect your physical as well as your emotional conditions. If you look after your teeth well and yet a tooth starts to decay, there could be an emotional issue needing to be resolved.
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Check out this fascinating INTERACTIVE TOOTH CHART and discover more!

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The meridian acupuncture system, known in Traditional Chinese Medicine since more than 5000 years, shows the vital relationship between your teeth and your sense organs, joints, spinal segments, vertebrae, organs and endocrine glands.
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“The mouth is the mirror to the body.”

Sir William Osier, a founding father of modern medicine

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Root canal treated teeth for example can create disturbing energetic blocks in the body, leading to the interruption of organ function. If a person has a weak internal organ, a root canal performed on the associated meridian tooth could make it considerably more problematic.

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Like muscles and organs, teeth store memories of events from your life and especially from any kind of stress.

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In her book  ‘Feelings Buried Alive Never Die’ Karol K Truman says each tooth as well as each organ represents a pair of emotions (positive and negative).

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Check out: www.toothwizards.com

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Gum disease more harmful than diabetes

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Gum Disease is more harmful than Diabetes

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According to new research gum disease carries a higher risk of causing a stroke than diabetes.

People are twice as likely to suffer from a non-fatal stroke as a result of gum disease compared to diabetes.

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Until recently high blood pressure and diabetes were widely accepted as major risks contributing to non-fatal stroke.

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The research puts the impact of gum diesease on the same level as high blood pressure as an independent risk factor associated to non-fatal stroke.

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Source:   Dental Tribune UK Edition April 18 – 24  2011

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Get blotting brushesfor you and your family to avoid gum disease in the first place.

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Join the Blotting ® evolution

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The Phillips Blotting Brush and Technique

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Dr Phillips had developed the unique Blotting Brush and the associated method of cleaning:  the Blotting Technique in the late 1960´s.

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The Blotting Brush

The unique feature of a Blotting Brush is their hollow bristles that have capillary action to draw plaque and debris from teeth and gums.

WEAPONS OF PLAQUE DESTRUCTION

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The Blotting Technique

The Blotting Technique lifts and holds plaque in the brush so that it can be removed.  Whereas brushing moves the plaque around the mouth and under the gums, the Blotting Technique is the only proven dental hygiene method that actually removes it from the mouth.

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The Technique is easy to get used to and the brushes are inexpensive which makes it understandable and affordable for everyone.

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Blotting Brush & Blotting Technique are the key to total oral health for a lifetime.

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Despite all the specialty toothpastes and mouthwashes available today gum disease is an ever increasing disease. Many suffer from it without ever knowing it.

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“No surgery has ever cured periodontal disease. Surgery shouldn’t be done until the mouth is healthy; surgery being only a post healing reconstructive procedure.” Dr.  J.E. Phillips

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Using the Blotting Technique  will enable you to clean 100% of your mouth – not just the 10% of your mouth taken up by your teeth.  You can even “floss” with this technique.

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Once you have purchased a Blotting Brush you are the proud owner

of the smallest and most effective health kit in the world.

 

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http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/dental-health-advice-from-the-experts.aspx

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So, what’s that tooth?

List of images in Gray's Anatomy: XI. Splanchn...

Image via Wikipedia

A complete set of adult teeth is made up of 32 individual teeth, and within this there are 4 different types of teeth all designed to do a slightly different job when it comes to biting, chewing and shredding food.

Incisors

Starting at the very front of the mouth, we have the incisors. Also known as the cutting teeth, we have 8 incisors (4 at the top, 4 on the bottom) which are flat and sharp in shape, and designed to slice through food. All incisors have a single conical root, which is long and planted deep into the mouth.

Canines

The 4 canine teeth we have as adults are the strongest teeth in our mouths, as they are designed to tear, shred and rip tougher foods like meat. On either side of our upper and lower incisors, our canine teeth are conical in shape to help grip and pull food, and also have the longest roots which are again long and conical in shape.

Premolars

Next along in the mouth, situated next to each of our 4 canine teeth, are our 2 premolars, 8 in total. Premolars, also known as bicuspids, are a cross between canines and molars, and are designed to both rip and tear (like canines) and chew and grind (like molars). All premolars have a single root, apart from the first premolars on the upper jaw which have 2 roots.

Molars

Adults have up to 12 molar teeth (4 being the furthest back known as Wisdom Teeth, which not all adults have), which are situated at the back of the mouth. Designed to chew and grind, molars are the flattest and largest teeth in our mouths, and on the upper jaw have 3 roots, and 2 roots on the bottom jaw.

With all teeth playing an equally important job when it comes to consuming food, it’s important to make sure you brush and clean each tooth as thoroughly and carefully as the rest. Have you considered the blotting technique?

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Periodontal Disease: The Hidden Dangers

Periodontal Disease in 53-year old man

Image by Dr Parveen Chopra via Flickr

Periodontal Disease: The Hidden Dangers

Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, isn’t just a source of bad breath and bleeding gums. In fact, this dangerous disease has been linked to a variety of different ailments. If you have gum disease, these many dangers will convince you why you need to get it treated as soon as possible. If you are one of the lucky ones who isn’t afflicted, take this information as reasons why you should work to prevent periodontal disease.

Doctors have repeatedly found that periodontal disease has a very strong link with gestational diabetes (as well as other forms of diabetes). If you are at risk for diabetes, you need to protect your gums. Research has even shown that gum disease is a strong predicter of mortality among natives who have diabetes. The bottom line is that if you have diabetes, gum disease makes it worse. People who are at risk of diabetes are more likely to fall victim to the disease if they have sick gums.

Gum disease has also been linked to heart problems such as heart disease and stroke. People who were diagnosed with acute symptoms were much more likely to have gum disease and similar infections. People with gum disease are around two times as likely to suffer from certain forms of heart disease, including coronary artery disease. Periodontal disease has also been proven to exacerbate these conditions in the people who already have them.

Women who are at risk of osteoperosis are also more likely to suffer from it if they have gum disease. They are also at a much higher risk for bone loss in the jawline, as well as tooth loss.

Periodontal disease can also affect unborn babies. Women who have gum disease are more likely to have premature babies, as well as babies with low birth weight. If you are planning to have a baby, make sure you don’t get gum disease.

There is some good news to this. Gum disease is easily treatable when caught in its early stages. Periodontal disease is also easily preventable. You don’t have to risk these deadly diseases if you make an effort to keep your gums clean and healthy.


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Blotting : A Natural Cure for Gum Disease

Gum disease needs early cure

Image by Dr Parveen Chopra via Flickr

Suffering from gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is no laughing matter. Your breath will smell terrible, you will be at a higher risk for heart disease, and advanced gum disease can lead to tooth loss. Bills for dental care can be sky-high, so it can be difficult to get it treated once you have it. Doesn’t sound great, does it?

However, blotting gives people the option of having a cure for gum disease without all the high bills and visits to the dentist.

Surely not? How?

Gum disease is caused by plaque, and regular brushing simply can’t get rid of it all.

Blotting removes the plaque that causes gum disease.

Unlike regular toothbrushes, blotting brushes use a tapping motion to get rid of the plaque that causes cavities, gum disease, and more.

The tiny bristles on the brush go underneath the gums and pull up the plaque. It uses capillary action to remove most of the plaque, and has been proven to be an effective way to prevent against gum disease. It literally blots the plaque off teeth, gums, and everywhere in between.

Unlike many diseases that have to do with oral health, gum disease is a malady where the symptoms can lessen (and then disappear) once the causes have been removed. This means that prevention – and the removal of plaque – is the cure to gum disease. This is also why blotting is a perfect way to cure gum disease before (and after) it happens.

Best of all, using a blotting brush is easy, especially if you get a DVD which explains how to blot your teeth properly.

It can reverse the damage done to teeth, and also reverses the damage done to gums by gum disease. It only takes a couple of minutes a day, and can also provide a gentle massage to teeth as well.

This cure for gum disease is all natural, requires no needles, and has no anesthesia. For people who hate going to the dentist, this is an incredible find.

This short video explains more:

For more information on blotting brushes and how they can help cure gum disease see here: Dr Philip’s Blotting Brushes

 

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/dental-health-advice-from-the-experts.aspx


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Smile, it’s good for you!

MM Smile Da

Image via Wikipedia

We have all heard the expression that laughter is the best medicine, but it turns out that simply by smiling you are increasing your state of happiness, as well. For years physical movements or restrictions have been linked to the reciprocal emotional effects, so it is no surprise that recent research studies have proved that a simple act such as smiling actually boosts your mood, and even your ability to enjoy.

Where we would usually surmise that our emotional state is linked to involuntary physical acts (such as an accidental bump leading to anger, being tickled leading to happiness), recent studies have showed that even being instructed to make physical expressions and movements can lead to enhanced emotions. For example, someone instructed to make an angry face showed enhanced blood flow to their hands and feet (which fits in with the physical reactions of kicking and punching when angry), and those instructed to smile found others around them more favourable than when straight-faced.

A great example of the latter is in a recent study, participants were instructed to watch funny cartoons. Those who were instructed to hold a pencil in their teeth and thus forced to make a smile, found the cartoons funnier than the other participants who were instructed to hold the pencil in their lips, thus preventing them from being able to smile.

So whilst we are often taught that it is all about mind over matter, remember that this is not always the case, and that in fact, forcing yourself to smile can actually improve your emotional state, even if it is just temporary. OK, you may look a little strange walking down the street grinning to yourself, or sitting at your desk at work with a big, slightly scary smirk or your face, but if it makes the day slightly more bearable, it’s worth it!

 

And of course, the perfect smile needs perfect teeth – so check out our blotting brushes to achieve gnashers to be proud of!

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Five Simple Steps to Maintain Healthy Gums and Teeth

Why is it that with all the technically advanced toothbrushes, toothpastes and mouthwashes available today, the incidence of gum disease and tooth decay is higher than ever before?

 
We even see young children suffering from gum disease.
 

 

WHY???

There are three main reasons

 

1. The food we eat today is so lacking in nutrients that we derive far less benefit from it then our ancestors. Carbonated drinks, juices (apple juice as a pH of only 2), sugary food, processed food and artificial sweeteners all add to this burden.

 

 

 

2. The daily cleaning habits are often insufficient in removing harmful bacteria from teeth, gums and tongue and do not reflect the need for a healthy mouth.

Toothpastes and mouthwashes  are not necessarily the most appropriate option for promoting oral health.

The modern methods ingrained into us through persistent marketing clearly haven’t been as effective as we are led to believe, especially with the overuse of chemicals.

 

3. Both 1 and 2 lead to an environment in your mouth that is more likely to be acidic then alkaline. And it´s only in an acidic mouth that harmful bacteria, that feed on sugars and carbohydrates, can thrive and infection starts.

 

 

 

Gum disease and Tooth decay are Infections!      

 

Mouth breathing, sinus problems, braces, acid reflux, bulimia and prescription drugs can increase acidity.

Bad breath might be a first sign the mouth gets too acidic. Other symptoms can be erosion of tooth enamel, discolouring of teeth and tooth sensitivity to cold and hot.

 

If someone in your family is suffering from gum disease or reoccurring tooth decay it is quite likely other family members have the same bacteria in their mouth as we pass them around.

 

Traditional cultures, the ones that haven´t converted to our so called civilised Western diet, hardly ever suffer from gum disease or tooth decay.

 

 

 

 

           The new era of prevention

 

To really keep your children´s and your own teeth sparkly white and healthy it is important to move beyond brushing, flossing and rinsing to a new standard of prevention.

Today prevention should first focus on changing the oral environment. The pH (acidic / alkaline level) of the mouth should be around 7 which mean it is alkaline.

This is achieved by using a totally different approach to oral health.

 

Your Whole Mouth Cleaning Programme

 

  1. Saliva check with pH testing paper
  2. Rinse with baking soda  for an alkaline mouth
  3. Clean your teeth, gums and tongue with your Blotting Brush
  4. Desinfect and store your Blotting Brush safely
  5. Add Xylitol and Probiotics to your diet

 

 

First the saliva pH needs to be tested and monitored over a period of at least five weeks and periodically afterwards. This is easily done with pH strips. To measure the pH of saliva fill a teaspoon with saliva and place a strip of the measuring paper in the liquid. After a few seconds remove the paper and read the pH by comparing the colour of the paper with the test strip provided. Always test at the same time of the day. I recommend straight after getting out of bed. Do not drink or eat for two hours before testing.

If the pH is below 7 it is even more important to follow the next steps to regain healthy alkaline saliva.

 

Second use an alkaline mouth rinse before start cleaning teeth. The most affordable way is using baking soda in a mix with luke warm water. Swished around your teeth for a minute will provide a highly alkaline environment.

 

Third is cleaning your teeth, gums and tongue.

According to research people in the U.S. spend an average of only 37 seconds brushing their teeth. You and your child can do better!

As long as your teeth and gums are healthy use any tooth brush you like but make sure it has a small head to reach every area. Electric tooth brushes especially the ultra-sonic ones are very effective.

Brushing without toothpaste allows your child to feel the bacterial biofilm before and after brushing, which is not possible when using toothpaste due to the flavour and wetting agents. Toothpaste makes the mouth feel clean even when it’s not. Dry brush first until the teeth feel clean and taste clean, then add toothpaste. Choose a toothpaste with as little as possible chemicals. Make sure it is flouride and sodium laureth sulphat free.

 

If your child already suffers from gum problems and / or tooth decay I recommend using  the Blotting Brush and Dr. Phillips Blotting Technique (for details see www.toothwizards.com). Blotting Brushes are used without toothpaste.

 

Now floss your teeth. The Blotting Brush can do this for you as well. Watch the video here

 

Flossing is followed by tongue scraping. The process of tongue cleaning removes millions of bacteria, decaying food debris, fungi, yeast (e.g. candida), and dead cells. This process is vital as 80-95% of bad breath originates from material at the back of the tongue. For best results gently scrape the surface of the tongue from the back to the front. Run the scraper under the tap after every scrape.

Watch www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFeb6YBftHE  for a funny and educational video clip.

 

Fourth. You need to clean your toothbrush after every use for at least 30 seconds with an antibacterial rinse such as Listerine original. Then rinse the bristles with water and store it head up allowing to dry. Keep your toothbrushes away from each other and never share toothbrushes! Change your toothbrushes regularly.

 

 

    Fifth. Introducing  Xylitol and Probiotics into your daily diet. Xylitol is a tooth friendly sugar, which         kills harmful bacteria in the mouth and has amazing benefits for teeth and general health. Xylitol comes in many different forms such as mints, gums, tooth paste, powder, granules or nasal spray. Look for products like those from Spry that are 100 percent xylitol-sweetened and available in health food stores or online.

Aim for five exposures of xylitol each day.

Most important to have Xylitol after each meal.

 

Oral probiotics (e.g EvoraKids) deliver millions of friendly bacteria to change the balance of bacteria in your mouth. Use them twice daily.

 

 

This  protocol is inexpensive, easy to follow, and, more importantly, you’ll notice a difference within a few days.

 

Also Check out www.toothwizards.com

 

Yours in healthy gums & teeth

 

Dr. Elmar Jung