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Gum Dis-ease

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Chapter 3 explains  Why You Get Gum Disease

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Gum Disease, also known as Periodontal Disease or Gingivitis isn’t a mysterious condition that strikes without warning.

The first signs of gum disease are easy to diagnose and, contrary to popular belief, often already originate in the teenage years. No matter how old you are, if your gums are swollen, dark red (darker than other gum areas) or bleed when you brush your teeth, you have gum disease.

In advanced stages, when the disease has progressed towards the root of the tooth the bleeding may stop but the teeth begin to move apart and the gums recede, eventually to the point where they can no longer support the teeth.

In a healthy mouth there are many types of bacteria that are usually free-floating and are not harmful.  People often talk about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ bacteria yet it is not the bacteria themselves that are helpful or harmful but the balance between these bacteria that is important. Only when one type of bacteria increases in number do problems begin.

What is Plaque?

We call the sticky white substance that forms on teeth, between them and in the area between the teeth and gums ‘plaque’. Run a rubber-tipped instrument along the baseline of your teeth and you will easily see the white material.

How Plaque can cause Gum Disease

When plaque collects along the gumline, it can cause gingivitis. Healthy gums form an elastic seal around each tooth to keep plaque and bacteria away from the sensitive roots. Plaque toxins and enzymes attack healthy gums, eventually creating pockets as the gums loosen and pull away from the tooth.

Your teeth comprise less than ten percent of the total mouth area. By just brushing your teeth, ninety percent of your mouth will remain untouched!

Total mouth hygiene includes cleaning your teeth, gums, inner cheek, roof and floor of your mouth and your tongue.  If all these areas are cleaned properly, twice a day gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth decay and bad breath will disappear in almost every instance.

Why Toothpaste is Bad for Your Teeth

Crest MultiCare Whitening toothpaste

Image via Wikipedia

The importance of good dental hygiene has never really been questioned, but in recent years some dental specialists have highlighted the potential repercussions of brushing out teeth with toothpaste. Whilst we have always associated good dental health with a toothpaste-floss-mouthwash routine, there is now evidence to support that actually, brushing with toothpaste can have a detrimental effect on our teeth.

So why could toothpaste be bad for your teeth? The answer is in the abrasive ingredients which are found in toothpaste, added to rid your teeth or stains and discolouration. The damaging effects of the abrasive fluorides found in toothpaste (stronger quantities are found in whitening toothpastes) are believed by many specialists to become even more harmful as those brushing their teeth brush harder to further rid their teeth of stains. Instead of making their teeth brighter, vigorous brushing instead damages their tooth enamel, which over time leads to discolouration and heightened sensitivity.

The research which suggests that toothpaste is bad for your teeth has been challenged by others who believe other factors should be taken into consideration when discussing the wearing away of the enamel, and general wear of the teeth. Other factors such as grinding, an acidic diet, bulimia and excessive brushing could contribute to the erosion of our teeth, but for some dentists, the fact remains that toothpastes contain abrasive fluorides which they believe are undeniably linked to tooth damage.

Some dentists, including the Boston-based dentist Dr. Valdemar Welz who has been converted after reading a published dental study by a leading clinical researcher, Dr. Thomas Abrahamsen, have decided to ditch the toothpaste and to brush instead with just a toothbrush and water, followed by flossing, to avoid the abrasive ingredients found in everyday toothpaste.

Some dentists, however, remain un-deterred by this study, instead believing that the benefits of fighting cavities and tooth-decay far outweigh the potential general wearing away of the teeth caused by toothpaste.

What do you think?

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The Philips Blotting Technique

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About Dr. Joseph Phillips

Dr. Joseph Phillips was a periodontist (a specialist in gum disease). He also taught that gum disease, subsequent surgery and tooth loss were wholly unnecessary if the mouth was cared for properly.

By the late 1960’s Dr Phillips had developed the unique Blotting Brush and the associated method of cleaning: the Blotting Technique.

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The Blotting Brush

The Blotting Brush is designed with four rows of end-rounded textured bristles that have a capillary action that draws plaque and debris from gingival crevices.

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The Blotting Technique

The Blotting Technique lifts and holds plaque in the brush so that it can be removed.  Whereas brushing moves this plaque around the mouth and under the gums, the Blotting Technique is the only proven dental hygiene method that actually removes it from the mouth.

Its simplicity and inexpensiveness makes it understandable and affordable for everyone.

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This is the key to total oral health for a lifetime.

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Despite all the specialty toothpastes and mouthwashes available today, people still have gum disease, many without ever knowing it.

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“No surgery has ever cured periodontal disease. Surgery shouldn’t be done until the mouth is healthy; surgery being only a post healing reconstructive procedure.” Dr.  J.E. Phillips

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Using the Blotting Technique you will be able to clean 100% of your mouth – not just the 10% of your mouth taken up by your teeth.  You can even “floss” with this technique.

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Once you have purchased a Blotting Brush you are the proud owner

of the smallest and most effective health kit in the world.

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BAD BREATH (Halitosis)

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Bad breath can undoubtedly lessen your confidence and self-esteem and in more extreme cases, cause depression. It does not need to be from now on if you follow the many recommendations on this site.

First thing to do is having your teeth checked by your dentist for any decay and gum disease. If you wear dentures ore have bridge work done get this checked as well. Also see that your sinuses are clear. If you smoke, well, you know what would be best.

Some illnesses  such as  diabetes or kidney dysfunction as well as being on severe diet can also cause bad breath.

If all the above is ok and Bad Breath still persists then the following tips may help.

1. Rinse your mouth with fresh water after every meal, add a teaspoon of salt and gargle

2.   Start by cutting down or cutting out alcohol, coffee, high-protein foods    and  alcohol-based mouthwashes,

3.   Avoid low carb and high fat diets

4.   Increase healthy raw fruit and vegetables Every morning and afternoon   bite into some hard, crisp fruit and vegetables like apples, cucumber, celery and raw carrot. These will naturally clean your teeth.

5.   Increase intake of Vitamin B (esp. B1 from whole grain cereals, green vegetables, beans and peas, brown rice and berries) as this is essential for digesting food properly                  

6.   Drink more water, especially if you are on any form of medication.

7.    Clean your tongue from right to the back and use plenty of water to ensure the  mucous and debris is washed away.

8.   Change the environment in your mouth so these anaerobic bacteria will no  longer grow. The best thing you can do to achieve this is to bring high amount of oxygen into the place where the bacteria live.

9.   Use the toothpaste we recommend in Chapter 6  to clean your teeth.

10.  Start implementing the Dr. Phillips Blotting Technique?

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You can also

  • chew fresh parsley;
  • take a teaspoon of whole cloves, a teaspoon of ground cinnamon and two  teaspoons of parsley, add them to a mug of boiling water, let it sit for 15 minutes, then gargle;
  • boil two teaspoons of anise seeds in water for 3 minutes, strain it and drink or swill round your mouth.

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Tooth Whitening

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Nothing says “Health” better than a vibrant smile.

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If you´re lucky enough to have one, it is a real asset you definitely want to protect.

And if yours is a bit less than perfect, you may want to consider taking advantage of cosmetic dentistry to improve the appearance of your teeth.

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Actually, it’s often more than just appearance:

The state of your mouth affects your overall health.

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One of the things you might be tempted to improve your smile is buying a tooth whitening kit and applying it on several occasions during the next week. The improvement will probably be instant – and gratifying – but you might be disappointed when the discolouration returns soon afterwards.

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When you then start to look at tooth cleaning kits, like 1.2 million other people do  EVERY MONTH,  you will probably surprised by the incredibly harsh chemicals used.

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And indeed you can find better  and more reliable methods.

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Whatever claims the product you are thinking of using makes, the facts are simple: your teeth can only be whitened successfully if they are clean and free of decay. Ignore this information and you may produce a very ‘uneven’ smile.  Hence my recommendation as a first step is having your teeth cleaned by a hygienist.

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You can attain great improvement in whitening your teeth by using oil pulling for about 6-8 weeks and finish off with your home made toothpaste (Chapter SIX) after every pulling session.

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There are several precautions you want to consider such as pregnancy, breastfeeding or smoking.

A good idea might be to check first with your dentist.

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How You Brush, Floss and Tongue Scrape

Chapter 5

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How You Brush, Floss and Tongue Scrape

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Brushing your teeth regularly is what most people assume to be sufficient to keep their teeth healthy.

Most people brush for less than a total of two minutes per day. Only a few consider flossing necessary.

Other cleaning techniques like tongue scraping are rarely used.

Do you know how your diet affects the health of your teeth?

If you have a gum condition it is possible that improper brushing and flossing can make the problem even worse.

You need to try the Dr. Philips Blotting Technique.

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Five Simple Steps to Maintain Healthy Gums and Teeth

Why is it that with all the technically advanced toothbrushes, toothpastes and mouthwashes available today, the incidence of gum disease and tooth decay is higher than ever before?

 
We even see young children suffering from gum disease.
 

 

WHY???

There are three main reasons

 

1. The food we eat today is so lacking in nutrients that we derive far less benefit from it then our ancestors. Carbonated drinks, juices (apple juice as a pH of only 2), sugary food, processed food and artificial sweeteners all add to this burden.

 

 

 

2. The daily cleaning habits are often insufficient in removing harmful bacteria from teeth, gums and tongue and do not reflect the need for a healthy mouth.

Toothpastes and mouthwashes  are not necessarily the most appropriate option for promoting oral health.

The modern methods ingrained into us through persistent marketing clearly haven’t been as effective as we are led to believe, especially with the overuse of chemicals.

 

3. Both 1 and 2 lead to an environment in your mouth that is more likely to be acidic then alkaline. And it´s only in an acidic mouth that harmful bacteria, that feed on sugars and carbohydrates, can thrive and infection starts.

 

 

 

Gum disease and Tooth decay are Infections!      

 

Mouth breathing, sinus problems, braces, acid reflux, bulimia and prescription drugs can increase acidity.

Bad breath might be a first sign the mouth gets too acidic. Other symptoms can be erosion of tooth enamel, discolouring of teeth and tooth sensitivity to cold and hot.

 

If someone in your family is suffering from gum disease or reoccurring tooth decay it is quite likely other family members have the same bacteria in their mouth as we pass them around.

 

Traditional cultures, the ones that haven´t converted to our so called civilised Western diet, hardly ever suffer from gum disease or tooth decay.

 

 

 

 

           The new era of prevention

 

To really keep your children´s and your own teeth sparkly white and healthy it is important to move beyond brushing, flossing and rinsing to a new standard of prevention.

Today prevention should first focus on changing the oral environment. The pH (acidic / alkaline level) of the mouth should be around 7 which mean it is alkaline.

This is achieved by using a totally different approach to oral health.

 

Your Whole Mouth Cleaning Programme

 

  1. Saliva check with pH testing paper
  2. Rinse with baking soda  for an alkaline mouth
  3. Clean your teeth, gums and tongue with your Blotting Brush
  4. Desinfect and store your Blotting Brush safely
  5. Add Xylitol and Probiotics to your diet

 

 

First the saliva pH needs to be tested and monitored over a period of at least five weeks and periodically afterwards. This is easily done with pH strips. To measure the pH of saliva fill a teaspoon with saliva and place a strip of the measuring paper in the liquid. After a few seconds remove the paper and read the pH by comparing the colour of the paper with the test strip provided. Always test at the same time of the day. I recommend straight after getting out of bed. Do not drink or eat for two hours before testing.

If the pH is below 7 it is even more important to follow the next steps to regain healthy alkaline saliva.

 

Second use an alkaline mouth rinse before start cleaning teeth. The most affordable way is using baking soda in a mix with luke warm water. Swished around your teeth for a minute will provide a highly alkaline environment.

 

Third is cleaning your teeth, gums and tongue.

According to research people in the U.S. spend an average of only 37 seconds brushing their teeth. You and your child can do better!

As long as your teeth and gums are healthy use any tooth brush you like but make sure it has a small head to reach every area. Electric tooth brushes especially the ultra-sonic ones are very effective.

Brushing without toothpaste allows your child to feel the bacterial biofilm before and after brushing, which is not possible when using toothpaste due to the flavour and wetting agents. Toothpaste makes the mouth feel clean even when it’s not. Dry brush first until the teeth feel clean and taste clean, then add toothpaste. Choose a toothpaste with as little as possible chemicals. Make sure it is flouride and sodium laureth sulphat free.

 

If your child already suffers from gum problems and / or tooth decay I recommend using  the Blotting Brush and Dr. Phillips Blotting Technique (for details see www.toothwizards.com). Blotting Brushes are used without toothpaste.

 

Now floss your teeth. The Blotting Brush can do this for you as well. Watch the video here

 

Flossing is followed by tongue scraping. The process of tongue cleaning removes millions of bacteria, decaying food debris, fungi, yeast (e.g. candida), and dead cells. This process is vital as 80-95% of bad breath originates from material at the back of the tongue. For best results gently scrape the surface of the tongue from the back to the front. Run the scraper under the tap after every scrape.

Watch www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFeb6YBftHE  for a funny and educational video clip.

 

Fourth. You need to clean your toothbrush after every use for at least 30 seconds with an antibacterial rinse such as Listerine original. Then rinse the bristles with water and store it head up allowing to dry. Keep your toothbrushes away from each other and never share toothbrushes! Change your toothbrushes regularly.

 

 

    Fifth. Introducing  Xylitol and Probiotics into your daily diet. Xylitol is a tooth friendly sugar, which         kills harmful bacteria in the mouth and has amazing benefits for teeth and general health. Xylitol comes in many different forms such as mints, gums, tooth paste, powder, granules or nasal spray. Look for products like those from Spry that are 100 percent xylitol-sweetened and available in health food stores or online.

Aim for five exposures of xylitol each day.

Most important to have Xylitol after each meal.

 

Oral probiotics (e.g EvoraKids) deliver millions of friendly bacteria to change the balance of bacteria in your mouth. Use them twice daily.

 

 

This  protocol is inexpensive, easy to follow, and, more importantly, you’ll notice a difference within a few days.

 

Also Check out www.toothwizards.com

 

Yours in healthy gums & teeth

 

Dr. Elmar Jung