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BAD BREATH (Halitosis)

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Bad breath can undoubtedly lessen your confidence and self-esteem and in more extreme cases, cause depression. It does not need to be from now on if you follow the many recommendations on this site.

First thing to do is having your teeth checked by your dentist for any decay and gum disease. If you wear dentures ore have bridge work done get this checked as well. Also see that your sinuses are clear. If you smoke, well, you know what would be best.

Some illnesses  such as  diabetes or kidney dysfunction as well as being on severe diet can also cause bad breath.

If all the above is ok and Bad Breath still persists then the following tips may help.

1. Rinse your mouth with fresh water after every meal, add a teaspoon of salt and gargle

2.   Start by cutting down or cutting out alcohol, coffee, high-protein foods    and  alcohol-based mouthwashes,

3.   Avoid low carb and high fat diets

4.   Increase healthy raw fruit and vegetables Every morning and afternoon   bite into some hard, crisp fruit and vegetables like apples, cucumber, celery and raw carrot. These will naturally clean your teeth.

5.   Increase intake of Vitamin B (esp. B1 from whole grain cereals, green vegetables, beans and peas, brown rice and berries) as this is essential for digesting food properly                  

6.   Drink more water, especially if you are on any form of medication.

7.    Clean your tongue from right to the back and use plenty of water to ensure the  mucous and debris is washed away.

8.   Change the environment in your mouth so these anaerobic bacteria will no  longer grow. The best thing you can do to achieve this is to bring high amount of oxygen into the place where the bacteria live.

9.   Use the toothpaste we recommend in Chapter 6  to clean your teeth.

10.  Start implementing the Dr. Phillips Blotting Technique?

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You can also

  • chew fresh parsley;
  • take a teaspoon of whole cloves, a teaspoon of ground cinnamon and two  teaspoons of parsley, add them to a mug of boiling water, let it sit for 15 minutes, then gargle;
  • boil two teaspoons of anise seeds in water for 3 minutes, strain it and drink or swill round your mouth.

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Today’s Diet & Nutrition, Part 2

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Every month a new diet is launched that claims to be the perfect one for you to lose weight, gain muscle strength, become healthier or live longer.

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The most media covered diets today include:

Atkins, Baby Food, Beverly Hills, Blood Type, Cabbage Soup, GI, Grapefruit, Hay, High Protein, Japanese, Low fat, Macrobiotic, Maple Syrup, Majo Clinic, Meal Replacement Shakes, Mediterranean, Metabolic Typing, Montignac, Scarsdale, Schnitzer, Skinny Bitch, Slimming World, South Beach, The Zone, Vegetarian, Vegan, Weight Watchers to name some of the weird and wonderful choices available.

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Look beyond the surface and you’ll realise that the entire weight loss industry is based on failure.

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Certainly there will be instances of pounds being shed, but this is usually accompanied by a strict regime of deprivation or replacement that isn’t healthy for the body.

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Despite this I find it fascinating that so called experts are claiming their diet is best for you even though they don´t know a single thing about you.

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One simple fact remains undeniable:

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After decades of specialist advice, people in the western world remain overfed and undernourished.

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The old adage

“One Mans food is another Man’s Poison” is absolutely true.

You are as unique as your fingerprints.

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Why would there be a diet that fits all of us?

Some people thrive on meat; others prefer to be vegetarian or vegan. Furthermore we each have different eating habits.

You might find you digest food better in the relaxed atmosphere of home whereas someone else digests better in a noisy environment.

Some people enjoy cold foods; others thrive on a spicy cuisine.

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Eskimos for example live on very high animal protein and fat but don´t suffer from heart disease or cancer because they really need this kind of slow burning foods to survive the challenging climate they live in.

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The Hunzukuts in Asia live on a diet high in complex carbohydrates and vegetables and are known for their extraordinary health and longevity.

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Of course there are some basic facts that need to be addressed when it comes to nutrition.

Eating food that is as natural as possible is clearly the most important one.

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