Posts

Tooth-Organ-Connection

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YOUR TEETH and YOUR BODY are CONNECTED

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I found this wonderful piece of art on Dr. Poschneider´s web site.

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One of many  stories from my clinic:

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For many years a patient had suffered from alternating constipation and diarrhoea together with pains in his stomach and large intestine before becoming a patient at my clinic. The initial x-ray showed a large bone loss on the lower right first molar.
This tooth is linked to the large intestine.
The tooth and the abscess were removed, the bone cleaned and some homeopathic remedies injected into this area.
When he came back for checking the healing process only a few days later, his pain was gone as were his constipation and diarrhoea.

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This gives you a first impression on how your teeth are connected with the rest of your body.

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If a tooth develops decay and another doesn´t, this isn´t just a case of poor nutrition and bad bushing. Your teeth reflect your physical as well as your emotional conditions. If you look after your teeth well and yet a tooth starts to decay, there could be an emotional issue needing to be resolved.
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Check out this fascinating INTERACTIVE TOOTH CHART and discover more!

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The meridian acupuncture system, known in Traditional Chinese Medicine since more than 5000 years, shows the vital relationship between your teeth and your sense organs, joints, spinal segments, vertebrae, organs and endocrine glands.
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“The mouth is the mirror to the body.”

Sir William Osier, a founding father of modern medicine

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Root canal treated teeth for example can create disturbing energetic blocks in the body, leading to the interruption of organ function. If a person has a weak internal organ, a root canal performed on the associated meridian tooth could make it considerably more problematic.

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Like muscles and organs, teeth store memories of events from your life and especially from any kind of stress.

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In her book  ‘Feelings Buried Alive Never Die’ Karol K Truman says each tooth as well as each organ represents a pair of emotions (positive and negative).

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Check out: www.toothwizards.com

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Chewing and Your Bite

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Digestion starts with chewing properly

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When food enters your mouth and you start chewing, this stimulates the release of pancreatic hormones and triggers other digestive organs to produce saliva.

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Saliva contains its own digestive enzymes, so the more you chew, the more time these enzymes have to work while the food is still in your mouth. This makes digesting less stressful for your stomach and small intestines.

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Austrian physician Franz Xaver Mayr showed that people’s digestive systems deteriorate when they eat too fast, too much, too often and too unhealthy.

He developed a diagnostic and therapeutic system to help restore the health of the intestines and thus of the entire organism.

He was a great believer that poor nutrition is reflected in the state of the teeth and gums and that ‘death beg
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Therefore I recommend you eat slowly and chew every single bite twenty two times!

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Chewing gum fools your brain and digestive organs into believing you’re eating food. Your stomach, pancreas, and other digestive organs prepare themselves to process food.

As chewing gum is not food, the production of digestive enzymes isn’t required. Instead, the overflow of unused digestive enzymes could start ‘attacking’ the walls of your intestines.

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The parts of your body that contribute to you being able to chew, breath, and swallow properly as well as keeping your posture stable involve your teeth, gums, jaws, supporting bones, muscles, joints, ligaments and tendons. For the whole system to function properly, every single part of this system must function properly.

It is important to understand what an important part of the skeletal system the teeth are. The way your top and bottom teeth fit together is crucial for the balance of your whole body and is a determining factor of the correct posture of your head.

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If you have a skeletal posture imbalance your body will have created patterns that compensate either up from your feet  or down from the head.
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For example if your jaw isn´t in the correct position it may cause your head to be slightly imbalanced on the neck. All the vertebrae and muscles that control them have to compensate. This can manifest as neck aches, head aches, back and shoulder pain, misaligned hips and uneven leg length.

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In the book you will also discover how your Breathing Patterns can affect your dental health, the dangers of snoring and what a comprehensive dental check up should include.

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